This year’s spring musical ranks as one of the best this school has ever done

The spring musical “The Drowsy Chaperone” is a spectacular must see. From the wonderful vocals to the fantastic costumes and set Marcy Goodnow’s drama students dazzle the audience with all the talent of a 65-plus cast and crew.

“Drowsy” will definitely be going into the metaphorical PRHS performance hall of fame and in many persons’ lists of favorites.

The Woman in Chair, played by junior Maycee Ham, narrates the comedy, a stage manager always present on stage playing her favorite record for the audience, a recording of 20s classic “The Drowsy Chaperone.” Ham helps with hilarious commentary about the actors and disgruntled attitude towards life in general throughout the show. The show even includes the regular mishaps of trying to listen to a record such as the music skipping, accidentally playing the wrong record, and interrupting rings from phones.

The show within the show is about starlet Janet van de Graff, played by the senior Amber Burgh, getting married to Robert Martin, played by junior Graham Farrell, and leaving Broadway, much to the chagrin of her producer.  The story takes place on Janet’s and Robert’s wedding day, where they have vowed not to see each other in order to make sure that no bad luck ensues. The chain of events is dramatic, hilarious, heartwarming, and impactful.

Outrageous characters fill the cast, such as the gangsters disguised as male pastry chefs–yet played by female trio Madecyn Penn, Jadyn Steaffens, and Ren Callahan–and the ostentatious unforgettable Aldolpho, a self-proclaimed European womanizer and simultaneous buffoon.

The swaggering and ever drowsy chaperone, played by junior Casey Galli, gives the production its title and zany twists, as she falls for Adolpho, who thinks she is the bride.

From the characters who come alive out of the record, the audience enjoys romance, tap dancing, mishaps, betrayals, and comedy on a level rarely achieved in high school theater. And as the Woman in Chair opens up about her life, both past and present, the audience hears truth: messages about life and happiness with the perfect mix of cynical and sarcastic flare.

A splendid, glittery array of costumes shimmers every scene, particularly Janet’s seven costume changes in the span of a single song. Add bathing suits. 20s outfits. Maid costumes. Monkeys in red jackets with cymbals. Ruth Enrique Basque has been at it again with her experience and Disney training, buying and making everything with the help of Goodnow, cast, and crew.

Behind the glitz of costumes and crazy characters was the well made and spectacular display of sets and props made by Geoff Higgins and the tech theatre class and the backstage crew. Set objects ranged from the simple, inviting chair and record player on the side of the stage to the grand aeroplane of Trix the Aviatrix, senior Julia Schulte, that is one of the most impressive props on the stage. These amazing costumes and props added to the wonderful tapping, singing, and acting skills of all the students and created a hilarious musical masterpiece.

In a pivotal moment, due to the loud dropping of a cane, the owner of the record is unable to hear a crucial portion the important message coming from the chaperone. The Woman in Chair believes that this phrase, which she is unable to hear, is either “Leave while you can” or “Live while you can.” The meaning of these phrases, while very different, both urge the audience to remember the shortness of life and make the most of it.

Whether you are leaving it or loving it, this show will have an impact. It is one of the best performances that this high school has ever had.

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