Defunding Planned Parenthood will only lead to better companies

Dermish’s video interview

opinionparenthood_infographic1In the beginning, I didn’t want to watch the grainy videos about Planned Parenthood and their careless dissection and sale of baby’s body parts.
So I resisted, tugging away from the videos, but I kept a careful watch on the events that followed. I saw politicians give speeches, blowing up the videos into bigger issues that included women’s rights, health care, and congressional funding.
The politics of it all created a very vague, nice sort of general knowledge that kept me rooted to my pro-life views without having to deal with any unpleasant facts.
Because ignorance is bliss. Right? And then I watched the video.
After the horrific stories I had heard about Planned Parenthood, I expected ugly old scientists who looked like murderous monsters, but as the video opened I saw a girl. She was young. Maybe late twenties, early thirties. She had short curled hair. Her name was Amna. She seemed so normal. She seemed like an older version of my sister.
She then began speaking casually. She talked about her process for an abortion at 22 weeks, and about pulling out the fetus, extracting them spine first, so that she could get them out whole. She talked about her disappointment with not being able to extract the whole brain out at once, as if she was speaking of a cake that wouldn’t come out of the pan quite right.
But she was talking about someone’s child. Wanted or not, she was talking about a person that was slowly knitted together. She was talking about endlessly complicated DNA coding that determines musical ability and a million other tiny parts of that human. She was talking about a being that would have an entirely unique set of fingerprints. She was talking about a baby. The only baby exactly like that to ever be born in the entirety of history. Yet, she talked like she was talking about a piece of gum that was stuck to the bottom of her shoe.
I always hate it in literature when a character is so obviously evil to me because I can see inside their mind and witness the selfishness or the hate that lingers there. I could never plannedparenthoodinfographic2understand how other characters, good characters, can still view the evil character as normal, sweet and caring, when from my standpoint, they clearly are not any of those things.
But I could have met and talked to Amna and, as the video started, I even liked her. She seemed like such a nice person. Then she talked about stretching women out, so that she could yank a baby from its mother, and sell it for stem cell research to the highest bidder.
My stomach rolled and churned.
This couldn’t be real. People like Amna–people who seem nice–they don’t just murder babies.
I was backpedaling, like all readers do when a character plot twists. I went back through every debate, every comment, every article I had seen and considered them, now knowing that people out there, people like Amna, were the ones behind the horrible things I had read about.
It seemed like something from the Hunger Games. But people were defending them. People were standing up for Amna, shield
ing her from the consequences of her actions, and they claimed it was because Planned Parenthood was a resource that America couldn’t do without.
I squinted, and leaned in, trying to see what reasons they had for their argument.
I believe they hide behind the argument that this is all for the greater good. The country needs Planned Parenthood? We need to do this to living miracles called children?
The greater good is a dangerous line to walk. Any evil can be justified by a supposed good that comes out of the evil. Where do we draw the line? When people are sold into slavery for the greater sake of a nation’s economy? Or when people are killed in the millions for the sake of convenience and choice?
I urge people to take a fresh look at Planned Parenthood, I beg you to watch the videos, as hard as it may be, and to watch people like Anna talk about the gory details of abortion. Because abortion is happening. Take the opposite side if you must, but at least be informed on what you are siding with. Know the actions that you are defending.

 

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Jessica likes reading writing and being on the journalism staff. She loves that she gets to be a part of such an epic family!

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